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DIY/Lo-Fi





From the Submissions: Susan Moon's "Mermaids (Hafgua)"

“Mermaids (Hafgua),” the latest single by New York artist (and erstwhile Deli NYC contributor) Susan Moon finds its niche in the space between minimalistic electronica and sound collage, a disparate collection of textures electronic and analogue. Solitary synths intertwine with the sounds of an ocean tide as Moon’s haunting vocal performance drifts through the scene, contributing to a melancholy, lonely final product. Susan Moon’s stumbling melodic phrasing, alongside her choice to incorporate field recordings embeds this track with a disorienting energy; with no percussive backbone tethering it to a familiar structure, one can’t help but feel lost at sea while listening, themselves at the whim of the artist’s winding, accessibly avant-garde craft. Stream it below, and catch Moon at the Well on February 19th, opening for Renny Conti.

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LA-based collective releases compilation ode to Green Day's "Insomniac"

Alex Johnson of power pop project Why Dogs Why has collected a mass group of indie and DIY friends to celebrate 25 years since Green Day released Insomniac, one of the band's seminal albums. The compilation record, Jesus Christ Supermarket: A Compilation to Celebrate 25 Years of Green Day’s Insomniac, contains covers of every song on Green Day's 1994 record, including The Rare Occasions covering "Armatage Shanks", Cheekface taking on "Walking Contradiction", and Kid Carrion mixing up "Brain Stew". Folks outside of LA take on some tracks as well, including Tulsa-based Team Chino's take on "Jaded". Take a listen to the compilation album below, and enjoy one of Green Day's best all over again. - Will Sisskind

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Take a chill pill with JW Francis on "Everything," plays Berlin 2.20

The lofi indie of JW Francis has a permissive, mellow quality, the type of music you might use as the soundtrack to a Super 8 home movie of you and your friends chilling about Prospect Park on a perfect summer day — and this vibe continues with his infectiously chill latest single “Everything.” Against blue wave chords and psych production stylings, Francis’ vox lazily drifts through the scene, sliding and homespun, espousing both a desire to tell his beloved that “he wants to tell [them] everything,” but also “wants to see what we can figure out on our own.” A short sweet song on discerning life’s enchanting mysteries in time, it’s perfect for fans of artists such as Makeout Videotape or Soko — listen below ahead of his show on Thursday, February 20th at Berlin.

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Marinara offers saucy rock on "I Feel Like Dog," plays Footlight 2.16

Brooklyn-based indie rock quartet (and presumed tomato-enthusiasts) Marinara provide charismatic lofi indie rock on I Feel Like Dog, a fresh LP evocative of early-2010s college radio rock and their erstwhile 90s slacker compatriots. Tracks like “Desert Schtick” and “Ugly Sleeper” wouldn’t be out of place on a Double Double Whammy compilation, with Nick Cortezi’s plainspoken vocal performance interweaving between warm riffing and a progressive pace. This isn’t to say the entirety of the album is a sunny romp — the band leaves space for downtempo moments of respite on “Marie,” “The Orchid,” and “The Wasp,” the last of which characterized by an unpretentious, six-minute build to one of the record’s best instrumental performances; Cortezi’s season-spanning recollection and quiet vox leads to epic shreds and an energetic percussive breakdown. These various highs and lows help to make I Feel Like Dog the very, very good record that it is — listen to it below ahead of their show at the Footlight on February 16th. —Connor Beckett McInerney

 

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Oil Bay's "Demo" is rightfully rough, plays C'mon Everybody 4.7

Demo is a cursory, two-track offering by Brooklyn-based five piece Oil Bay, one that despite its short nine-minute run time firmly establishes the band’s ear for enchanting garage and tactile synths. A-Side “STRANGERdemo” builds mystery with its noir-inspired melodies and instrumentation, rife with lurid allusions to late night tales and heavy-compress guitars, opening with equal measures of disorienting keys and screaming strings, this downtempo energy fading with the introduction of “SpacesuitDEMO” and its accompanying breakbeat pace. With no shortage of reverb and a flexibility to incorporate experimental electronic accents into their lofi sound Oil Bay is tailor-made for listeners looking for gritty, noisy Indie rock — listen below, and catch them at C’Mon Everybody on April 7th.

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